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Science Area: Supercomputing

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In the “Star Trek” episode “The Ultimate Computer,” the Starship Enterprise tests a fully automated command and control platform that can—hypothetically—do everything the crew does, only faster and without the inevitable human error. Not surprisingly, things go awry and the computer goes rogue, f...

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ORNL is proud of its role in fostering the next generation of scientists and engineers. We bring in talented young researchers, team them with accomplished scientists and engineers, and put them to work at the lab’s one-of-a-kind facilities. The result is research that makes us proud and prepares th...

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For some researchers, cracking the big questions can be like mining for a lone diamond under tons of solid rock.

In those situations it helps to have a good set of tools, particularly the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility and its Titan supercomputer.

Titan isn’t the facility’s first worl...

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ORNL early-career award-winner Travis Humble promotes quantum computing at the lab.

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For all the power and complexity of today’s computers, they can still be boiled down to the binary basics—using a code of 1’s and 0’s to calculate and store information. Since the 1980s, though, some computer scientists have strayed from this simple language. They suggest that computers could speak ...

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The waste tanks at Hanford and Savannah River may not be DOE’s only environmental challenge, but they’re at the top of the list.

Hundreds of tanks hold 90 million gallons of highly radioactive, extremely toxic liquids and sludges. The tanks are in constant flux, although they are nowhere ne...

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There’s a good reason research institutions keep pushing for faster supercomputers: They allow the researchers to develop more realistic simulations than slower machines. This is indispensable for scientists and engineers striving to understand the workings of the universe or to create powerful new ...