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ALLOY SELECTION AND C-276 CODE DESIGN VALUE EXTENSION FOR ADVANCED MOLTEN SALT TECHNOLOGY TEST FACILITIES EXPERIMENTATION...

by Weiju Ren, Kevin R Robb
Publication Type
Conference Paper
Book Title
Proceedings of the ASME 2020 Pressure Vessels & Piping Division Conference
Publication Date
Conference Name
2020 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference (ASME PVP)
Conference Location
Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America
Conference Sponsor
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Conference Date
-

Molten halide salts are being considered as working fluids for nuclear and concentrated solar power applications. High temperature molten fluoride and chloride salts are known to preferentially attack and deplete Cr in alloys, which leads to the use of high-Ni lower-Cr alloys in test facilities for advanced Molten Salt Technology. Alloys 600 and C-276 are two commercially available Ni alloys that have moderate Cr contents and are qualified to the maximum temperature of 649°C and 677°C (1,200°F and 1,251°F), respectively, in the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Both alloys have good corrosion resistance to acids, are resistant to stress-corrosion cracking, and have long track records of use in the chemical industry. Comparatively, Alloy C-276 has a similar Cr content but much higher allowable stresses for temperatures greater than 600°C (1,112°F). Therefore, it has been considered as a structural material for test facilities that require operations at 700°C (1,292°F) or greater to develop high-temperature Molten Salt Technology. To meet the requirements, the current code design values were extended based on some experimental data. Analysis showed that above current Codified maximum temperature, strength of the alloy is mainly controlled by creep rupture life under the average stress, although the Sc creep rate criterion is close to the Favg.Savg rupture criterion. This paper presents the intended test facilities and the design requirements, alloy selection considerations, literature review, data analysis, and proposed allowable stress extension based on some creep test data for C-276 at temperatures greater than 677°C (1,251°F). Further research activities are also briefly mentioned.