Liam F Collins

Staff Scientist

My research is focused on characterizing electrostatic, ionic, electronic, mechanical and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface. My goals include developing techniques capable of studying electrochemical phenomena locally on the level of a single nanopore, step edge, or structural defect and applying them to study energy materials and devices under in-operandi conditions. In ambient and ultra-high vacuum environments Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) has become one of the primary techniques for mapping surface potentials. Until now, however, implementation in conductive liquids was impossible. I am developing multidimensional approaches (e.g. electrochemical force microscopy) combined with fast detection and information theory analysis to push the limits beyond that of existing KPFM approaches.

Awards

CNMS Distinguished Patent Award 2018
CNMS Postdoctoral Award 2017
R&D 100 Award 2016
Microscopy Today Innovation Award 2016
MRS Graduate Student Gold Award 2014