Three ORNL researchers named American Physical Society fellows

Three ORNL researchers named American Physical Society fellows

  • ORNL researcher Gaute Hagen has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society.
    ORNL researcher Gaute Hagen has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society. (hi-res image)
  • ORNL researcher Masaaki Matsuda has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society.
    ORNL researcher Masaaki Matsuda has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society. (hi-res image)
  • ORNL researcher Parans Paranthaman has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society.
    ORNL researcher Parans Paranthaman has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society. (hi-res image)
  • ORNL researcher Gaute Hagen has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society.
  • ORNL researcher Masaaki Matsuda has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society.
  • ORNL researcher Parans Paranthaman has been elected fellow of the American Physical Society.

Media Contact

Sean Simoneau, Communications
simoneausm@ornl.gov, 865.241.0709

OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Oct. 25, 2018 – Three researchers from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been elected fellows of the American Physical Society (APS).

Fellows of the APS are recognized for their exceptional contributions to the physics enterprise in outstanding research, applications and leadership in or service to physics and physics education. Each year, less than one half of one percent of the Society’s membership is recognized by their peers for election to the status of APS Fellow.

Gaute Hagen, task leader of the Nuclear Theory program in ORNL’s Physics Division, was cited by the APS Division of Nuclear Physics “for contributions to the development of coupled-cluster models in nuclear physics and his theoretical predictions for the structure of rare isotopes.”

Hagen’s research with the Nuclear Theory group focuses on computational and theoretical advances in ab-initio approaches for atomic nuclei with the goal of understanding the structure and decays of nuclei and the physics of matter at the extremes of the nuclear landscape. Hagen earned his doctorate in theoretical nuclear physics from the University of Bergen in Norway and received a Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career Award for understanding weak processes in atomic nuclei from first principles.

Masaaki Matsuda, neutron scattering scientist in the Spectroscopy Group of ORNL’s Neutron Sciences Directorate, was cited by the Division of Condensed Matter Physics “for important contributions to the study of spin-lattice effects in frustrated magnets and to the study of electronic phase separation and magnetic excitations in lightly-doped high-TC cuprate superconductors in using neutron scattering.”

Matsuda is an instrument scientist on the Polarized Triple-Axis Spectrometer at ORNL’s High Flux Isotope Reactor, a DOE Office of Science User Facility where he researches magnetism in strongly correlated electron systems, quantum spin systems and multiferroic systems. Matsuda was a principal researcher at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Riken, the Japanese Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, before joining ORNL in 2010.

Parans Paranthaman, Corporate Fellow and leader of the Materials Chemistry Group in ORNL’s Chemical Sciences Division, was cited by the APS Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics “for distinguished contributions to the field of materials synthesis and characterization for high temperature superconductors, solar cells, lithium ion batteries and additive manufacturing of magnetic materials.”

Paranthaman is a Distinguished UT-Battelle Inventor, 2016 ORNL Inventor of the Year and a UT-ORNL joint faculty member with the Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education. He is a fellow of several professional societies, including the National Academy of Inventors, MRS and AAAS, and has 42 patents and more than 400 journal publications with a Google scholar h-index of 62 related to superconductivity, energy storage and solar cells.

ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. DOE’s Office of Science is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit http://science.energy.gov/.

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