Brian H Davison

Chief Scientist for Systems Biology and Biotechnology

Brian H. Davison is Chief Scientist for Systems Biology and Biotechnology, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is the Chief Science Officer for the new Center For Bioenergy Innovation (cbi.ornl.gov). He was the Science Coordinator in the DOE Bioenergy Science Center (www.bioenergycenter.org) from 2007 to 2017. He is an Adjunct Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Tennessee-Knoxville. He was Director of Life Sciences Division at ORNL (2004-2005). In his thirty-four years at ORNL, he performed biotechnology research including bioconversion of renewable resources (ethanol, organic acids, solvents), non-aqueous biocatalysis, extractive fermentations, biomass conversion and characterization, and catalytic upgrading of ethanol into fuels. He has 180+ publications and thirteen patents. He received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology, and his B.S.E. in Chemical Engineering, from the University of Rochester.
He led a multilab team which received an R&D100 Award in 1997 for “Production of Chemicals from Biologically Derived Succinic Acid,” a process ultimately licensed by BioAmber. The ethanol upgrading technology is licensed by Vertimass. He received the ORNL Technology Transfer award (2018). He was the ORNL Science Communicator of 2010 for efforts in bioenergy and education. He co-chaired the 15th to 26th Symposia on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals. He received the 2006 C.D. Scott award by the Society of Industrial Microbiology. He is on the Board of the AIChE Society for Biological Engineering. He co-founded the Gay, Lesbian Or Bisexual Employees (GLOBE) group at ORNL in 1995 and has served as spokesperson and chair to promote nondiscrimination and benefit policy changes. He is chair of the ORNL Institutional Biosafety Committee since 2002. He is a Fellow of AIChE, SIMB, and AIMBE.

Patents

Narula, C. K., B. H. Davison, “Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock,” United States Patent 9,944,861 awarded April 17, 2018
Narula, C. K., B. H. Davison, and M. Keller, “Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons,”
United States Patent 9,938,467. awarded April 10, 2018
Narula, C. K., B. H. Davison, and M. Keller, “Zeolitic Catalytic Conversion of Alcohols to Hydrocarbons,” U.S. Patent 9,533,921-B2, issued date January 3, 2017.
C. K. Narula, B. H. Davison, and M. Keller, “Catalytic conversion of Alcohols to hydrocarbons with Low benzene content,” (part 2). PCT/US 201202942.0, U. S. Patent 9,434,658 (September 6, 2016).
C. K. Narula, B. H. Davison, and M. Keller, “Catalytic conversion of Alcohols to hydrocarbons with Low benzene content,” PCT/US 20140322781, (10/30/2014 published) U. S. Patent 9,278,892 (March 8, 2016).
C. K. Narula, B. H. Davison, “Catalytic conversion of alcohols having at least three carbon atoms to hydrocarbon blendstock,” 20150011813 (1/8/2015, published); USPTO#9,181,493 (issued 11/10/2015).
Scott, C.D., Scott, T.C., and Davison, B.H., "Apparatus and Method for the Production of Gel Beads Containing a Biocatalyst", U.S. Patent No. 5,712,212, January 27, 1998. Combined with U.S. Patent No. 5,72588A, March 8, 1998.
Scott, T.C., Scott, C.D., Faison, B.D., Davison, B.H., and Woodward, J., “Enhanced Attrition Bioreactor for Enzyme Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Materials,” (CIP) U.S. Pat. 5,637,502, June 10, 1997.
Scott, C.D., Petersen, J.N., and Davison, B.H., “Continuous Fluidized-Bed Contactor with Recycle of Sorbent,” U.S. Patent 5,534,153, July 9, 1996.
Scott, T.C., Scott, C.D., Faison, B.D., Davison, B.H., and Woodward, J., “Enhanced Attrition Bioreactor for Enzyme Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Materials,” U. S. Patent 5,508,183, April 16, 1996.
Scott, C.D., Faison, B.D., Davison, B.H., and Woodward, J., “Process for Converting Cellulosic Materials into Fuels and Chemicals,” U. S. Patent 5,345,871, September 20, 1994.
Scott C.D., and Davison, B.H., “Attrition Bioreactor System,” U. S. Patent 5,248,484, September 28, 1993.