ORNL awarded $3.36 million from ARPA-E for connected and automated vehicle research

ORNL awarded $3.36 million from ARPA-E for connected and automated vehicle research

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Kim Askey, Communications
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Connected, automated vehicles will be  part of an integrated control technologies-based system that could increase energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Connected, automated vehicles will be part of an integrated control technologies-based system that could increase energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. (hi-res image)
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Nov. 7, 2016 -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been awarded $3.36 million from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to develop novel control technologies for connected and automated vehicles with the goal of achieving a 20 percent improvement in vehicle energy efficiency.

The project will focus on developing and implementing control technologies in a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) to achieve the following: compute optimal routing to bypass bottlenecks, accidents, special events, and other conditions that affect traffic flow; accelerate and decelerate optimally based on traffic conditions and the state of the surrounding roads; and optimize onboard powertrain efficiency.

"This approach changes the mathematical framework of how the vehicle is controlled and optimized today. With our proposed concept, the vehicle will no longer operate in isolation but will be considered as part of an integrated system, which ultimately could help increase energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said ORNL’s Andreas Malikopoulos, the project’s principal investigator.

Other co-investigators on the project include Christos Cassandras of Boston University, Li Jiang of Robert Bosch LLC and Huei Peng of the University of Michigan.

ORNL received this competitive award from ARPA-E’s NEXT-Generation Energy Technologies for Connected and Automated On-Road Vehicles (NEXTCAR) program, which seeks to leverage vehicle connectivity and automation technologies to optimize vehicle controls and powertrain operation. Using Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V), Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I), and Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) technologies, NEXTCAR projects will enable better communication between and coordination of vehicle-level and powertrain-level actions, improving individual vehicle and, ultimately, fleet efficiency.

UT-Battelle manages ORNL for the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit http://science.energy.gov/.

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