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ORNL's Communications team works with news media seeking information about the laboratory. Media may use the resources listed below or send questions to news@ornl.gov.

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U.S. Secretary of Energy Granholm tours ORNL’s world-class science facilities

Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm visited ORNL on Nov. 22 for a two-hour tour, meeting top scientists and engineers as they highlighted projects and world-leading capabilities that address some of the country’s most complex research and technical challenges. 

ORNL scientists developed a scalable, low-cost electrochemical pulse method to improve the contact between layers of materials in solid-state batteries, resolving one of the key challenges in the development of energy-dense solid-state batteries. Credit: Andy Sproles/ORNL, U.S. Dept. of Energy

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a scalable, low-cost method to improve the joining of materials in solid-state batteries, resolving one of the big challenges in the commercial development of safe, long-lived energy storage systems.

Erdem Asa is leveraging his power electronics expertise to adapt ORNL’s wireless charging technology to unmanned aerial vehicles. Credit: Erdem Asa/ORNL, U.S. Dept. of Energy

Having co-developed the power electronics behind ORNL’s compact, high-level wireless power technology for automobiles, Erdem Asa is looking to the skies to apply the same breakthrough to aviation.

Marm Dixit, a Weinberg Distinguished Staff Fellow in the Emerging and Solid-State Batteries Group at ORNL, has received a Toyota Young Investigator Fellowship for Projects in Green Energy Technology from the Electrochemical Society. Credit: Carlos Jones/ORNL, U.S. Dept. of Energy

Marm Dixit, a Weinberg Distinguished Staff Fellow in the Emerging and Solid-State Batteries Group at ORNL, has been awarded a Toyota Young Investigator Fellowship for Projects in Green Energy Technology from the Electrochemical Society.

Hope Corsair. Credit: Carlos Jones, ORNL/U.S. Dept. of Energy

When Hope Corsair’s new colleagues at Oak Ridge National Laboratory ask her about her area of expertise, she tells them it’s “context.” Her goal as an energy economist is to make sure ORNL’s breakthroughs have the widest possible

ORNL has licensed its high-powered wireless vehicle charging technology to HEVO, including the Oak Ridge Converter, which reduces the size and increases the efficiency of grid-to-vehicle power transfer infrastructure. Credit: Carlos Jones/ORNL, U.S. Dept. of Energy.

ORNL has licensed its wireless charging technology for electric vehicles to Brooklyn-based HEVO. The system provides the world’s highest power levels in the smallest package and could one day enable electric vehicles to be charged as they are driven at highway speeds.

Automated disassembly line aims to make battery recycling safer, faster

Researchers at ORNL have developed a robotic disassembly system for spent electric vehicle battery packs to safely and efficiently recycle and reuse critical materials while reducing toxic waste.

Innovation Crossroads Cohort 5 includes left to right: Caleb Alexander, DayLyte Batteries; Sam Evans, Unbound Water Technologies; Tommy Gibbons, Hempitecture; Shuchi “SK” Khurana, Addiguru; Forrest Shriver, Sentinel Devices; and Philip Stuckey, FC Renew.

Six science and technology innovators from across the United States will join the fifth cohort of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Innovation Crossroads program in June.

ORNL researchers developed an innovative insulation system that uses sensors and controls to exchange heat or coolness between a building and its thermal energy storage system, which maximizes energy savings. Credit: Andrew Sproles and Michelle Lehman/ORNL, U.S. Dept. of Energy

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a novel envelope system that diverts heat or coolness away from a building and stores it for future use.

ORNL’s green solvent enables environmentally friendly recycling of valuable Li-ion battery materials. Credit: Andy Sproles/ORNL, U.S. Dept. of Energy

Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a solvent that results in a more environmentally friendly process to recover valuable materials from used lithium-ion batteries, supports a stable domestic supply chain for new batteries and keeps old ones out of landfills.