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Rachel L. Seibert

We ask some of our young researchers why they chose a career in science, what they are working on at ORNL, and where they would like to go with their careers.

Patrick Caveney

We ask some of our young researchers why they chose a career in science, what they are working on at ORNL, and where they would like to go with their careers.

Oluwaseun Ogunro

We ask some of our young researchers why they chose a career in science, what they are working on at ORNL, and where they would like to go with their careers.

Paritosh Santosh Mhatre

We ask some of our young researchers why they chose a career in science, what they are working on at ORNL, and where they would like to go with their careers.

ORNL quantum computing scientist Travis Humble

Researchers have been intrigued by the possibility of quantum computing at least since the early 1980s, going back to the colorful Caltech physicist Richard Feynman’s declaration that “nature isn’t classical, dammit, and if you want to make a simulation of nature, you’d better make it quantum mechanical.”

Neutron scientist Clarina dela Cruz

Quantum materials have a variety of potential uses—in novel sensors or powerful quantum computers, for instance— but they no doubt have uses that we haven’t even considered yet.

D-Wave 2000Q quantum computer

For all its strangeness—or perhaps because of it—quantum mechanics holds enormous technological promise. Computers built on the unique rules of quantum mechanics have the potential to solve problems that are literally unsolvable on even the most powerful traditional computers. Quantum key distribution seems poised to bolster information security, and materials built on the interactions of quantum particles form the basis of extremely sensitive detectors.