News

SHARE

Energy Efficiency - Heat to power

 

Combined heat and power (CHP) technologies, which capture and reuse waste heat from electric or mechanical power, account for about 9 percent of annual U.S. power generation. Roughly doubling that capacity could cut projected U.S. carbon dioxide emissions by 60 percent by 2030— the equivalent to taking 45 million cars off the road — an Oak Ridge National Laboratory study shows. Current CHP systems made up of gas turbines, fuel cells or engines combined with heat exchangers and chillers cut 1.8 billion Btu of fuel consumption and 266 million tons of CO2 emissions compared to traditional separate production of electricity and thermal energy. In addition to the 60 percent CO2 reduction, raising CHP generating capacity to 20 percent would create a million new jobs; $234 billion in new U.S. investments; and fuel savings equivalent to nearly half the total energy now consumed by U.S. households. The ORNL report on "Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future" is sponsored by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Industrial Technologies Program.

 -  Media Relations,  865.576.1946,  December 09, 2008
ASK ORNL

We're always happy to get feedback from our users. Please use the Comments form to send us your comments, questions, and observations.